Sorry, no swaps at the moment

I sort of taken a leave of absence with swapping postcards due to a very demanding job. However, I still managed to swap a few to persistent – and I say this in a good way – individuals. I am just amused at them because I really see myself in them, too.

I recently have resorted to envelope printing. I am so embarrassed now that I have a really lousy handwriting. Back in high school and uni, I used to have a really nice handwriting that my teachers praised. THis is which is why I love writing on envelopes. But since long years of computer-use has made my handwriting ugly.

Anyways, moving on, I would like to thank my friends from Germany, Anastasia, for the whimsical planner, and also to my two friends from Operation Smile Singapore, Lifen and Lai, for the lovely postcard from Nepal.

 

Wednesday Around the World: Kep, Cambodia

I heard a lot about this photo meme from a friend that I got very interested to join. So yeah, in order to take a break from posting stamps and postcards, I’m jumping into the Wednesday Around the World bandwagon to show my part of the world:

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Low tide. Kep Beach, near the Crab Market in Kep, Cambodia.

It has been three years since I last visited Kep. Back then, Kep used to be our favourite weekend getaway. My husband and I cherish the simple, laid-back and slow-paced lifestyle of Kep. Not to mention the fresh seafoods – shrimps, squids and crabs – these fishermen catch that are served on our table the next day.

Nowadays, the quiet days are gone, I am told, with the arrival of investors and the droves of wide-eyed tourists. It is becoming like the Sihanoukville these days. So many new hotels, restaurants and bars have mushroomed to cash in on this new tourist destination. Instead of hippies toting guitars, they are now outnumbered by rowdy over-staying backpackers who prefer electronica and those fancy sounding floyd rose tremolo at guitar center. So you can just imagine how the changes are. I long for the olden days of Kep.

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Home, sweet home

Quick post – a picture of our new house.

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It’s a lovely, traditional Khmer wooden house that was just vacated by its previous tenants. My husband and I found it fortuitously while we were at the end of our rope in search for a new place. The house is located in Boeung Tumpun area, south of the city, tucked in a leafy neighbourhood with small roads and a mix of apartments and dainty wooden houses. It is very old and basic but just oozing with character. We know right away that this will be a nice home.

There were some furniture left by the previous tenants which the landlord and his wife offered to us to use. I was amazed at how much was left – dining table and chairs, washing machine, wooden beds, fans, a fancy electric guitar with 8 string cobalt (which is now in the possession of the landlord’s teenaged son) and many more.

We moved in on New Year’s eve and, although we have not moved in completely, we love the fact that the we are getting enough sleep and rest and relaxation in this place.

Also posting stamps here

This blog is supposed to purely for postcards that I received via Postcrossing, direct swaps, or sent by friends and family. Since these postcards have stamps affixed to them, and the numbers are increasing even though I have another blog exclusively for stamps, I decided to feature some of them here, not only for Sunday Stamps but any given day.

So to begin, I’d like to share this stamp from Turkey:

Part of a four-set of commemorative stamps issued in 2009.
Part of a four-set of commemorative stamps issued in 2009.

The stamp shows the Turkish people in traditional Turkish costumes celebrating the 800th birth anniversary of Haci Bektaş Veli, a renowned figure in the history and culture of both the Ottoman Empire and the modern-day Turkey. Music is a big part in most holidays and festivals in Turkey. Back in the day, the whole community gathered around in dancing and singing. These days, I suppose a lot of younger people enjoy music played on a rca mp3 player but the traditional music still lives on.

Hey, hey, hey!

Hello, blog. It’s been a long while.
It’s been — what — nearly two months. Gosh.

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Welcome to Banlung, Ratanakiri!

For those not in the know, I got a job in August and since then, I’ve been busy with the surgical missions – two times already – pre and post-mission preparations as well as the mission itself that lasts at least 5 days, not including the travel time. What an international volunteer remarked the other day is so true – mission coordinators do not have a life at all. We don’t have enough sleep, we don’t eat when not everyone hasn’t eaten yet, and we do not have a night life. Good luck to me next year then.

Now that we just wrapped up our most recent surgical mission in Banlung, Ratanakiri province, I am swamped with paper works. My back aches from too much slouching in front of the computer, typing out reports and letters and other stuff. My eyes and head hurt from too much staring at the computer monitor. Gah.

One time I allowed lazy self to take over and wandered over the Internet. I got hooked in the online buy and sell group of expats here in the Penh. There’s so much going on – from selling (and buying) home and office items, to musical instruments. I didn’t know a lot that there’s a lot of music enthusiasts in the expat community as there are lots of electric guitars, drum sets, sound systems – what is a budda amp, by the way?

Anyways, going back. My postcard-swapping activities will resume shortly. Just allow me to wallow in idleness for a while just because… I think I deserve to, considering the stressful mission that I just been to.

Broken scanner

As mentioned in my previous post, I have been away for so long that the mails on my email accounts need sorting out. From the email I use for my swapping activities, I receive more than a thousand emails already. Emails from people who want to swap, and yes, junk mails, too.

I was going through it one by one because if I didn’t, I might erase unintentionally some emails that are rather important. Like the case of my coursera application – I almost forgot that I used this particular email to contact coursera. There is also one email from the reid supply homepage which I bookmarked simply because it has some tools that my husband needs in his mini-workshop.  My husband likes to create things and then let his students do the same and develop their English communication skills through this.

Anyhoo, I digress.
I just found out that our scanner doesn’t work anymore :( I have lots of postcards that needed scanning for publishing them here. So it has to wait till we get a technician to check out what’s wrong with it. So please come back next time for new postcards – lots of them.

Computer Security alert

Hi. It’s been awhile, isn’t it?

If you’re disappointed about the lack of updates here, well, you are not alone. My friends are, too. I myself is very disappointed because I could not seem to push myself and finish my drafts.

Work is really getting more hectic, and from the way I see it now, looks like I’m going to stay longer. Hurrah for me! Anyways, I was not totally offline as I’ve been browsing through a lot of sites lately. Just reading, mostly, and I have to congratulate myself for successfully keeping myself from commenting. Yay.

In one of the sites I surfed, I found this online article about Internet spying by Cyberexpert Nate Anderson, Meet the Men who Spy on Women through their Webcams. It is scary! I recommend this to everyone, most especially young and vulnerable females, to read this as it exposes how hackers can infiltrate your computers remotely and use your camera to spy on you, or worse, blackmail you. This is a great article on Computer Security, or the lack thereof.

Sunday Stamps 089: Into the wild we go

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The title of my post this week reminds of this movie of the same title that I watched a long time ago. It’s a true story of a young American, freshly graduated from university and abandons his material possessions to live in the wilderness. It’s a heart-wrenching story.

Anyways, I digress.

My entries for this week come from Malaysia.

First up is the Korean tiger, Panthera tigris altaica, and is the largest tiger subspecies that is found from Russia to Korea. This stamp is one of the two issued in 2010 by Pos Malaysia to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Malaysian-South Korean diplomatic relations.

I love the neat postmark! It's mailed from Butterworth in Penang, Malaysia!
I love the neat postmark! It’s mailed from Butterworth in Penang, Malaysia!

The other tiger subspecies featured in this commemorative issue, the Panthera tigris jacksoni, is the smallest tiger subspecies confined to Peninsular Malaysia. The stamp set is beautiful and the issuing date coincided also with the Year of the Tiger. South Korean also issued the same design of tiger stamps on the same day. See the set below:

Source: Pos Malaysia.
Source: Pos Malaysia.

sunday-stamps-wild-animals-on-malaysian-stampI have two more stamps, as you can see on the left. On top is a stamp showing a teludu, also known as the Malay badger, stink or skunk badger common in Borneo’s wild. This stamp is from the nocturnal animals series issued by Pos Malaysia in 2008.

What’s more interesting is that the stamps from this series are glow-in-the-dark! Unfortunately for me, I didn’t know it right from the day I received it. I learned about this only now while researching for some info. I’ll try it tonight and let you know if it indeed glows in the dark :)

The stamp at the bottom features a burung pikau, or the Asian blue quail, Coturnix chinensis, and is a part of the same family as the pheasants Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. This stamp was part of the fauna series issued in 2001.