Postcard Perfect 025: Lovely Russian dolls all in a row

Postcard Perfect New

I wasn’t scheduled to go to the Post Office last weekend but since my friend and I were already in the vicinity,  a morning of window-shopping, we decided to drop by.  We  both came home happy at the end of the day. She, with a two pairs of shoes and a new ipod nano case; for me, a new set of crochet hooks and cotton yarns, six official postcards from Postcrossing as well as two packets from Croatia and Canada. What a day it was!

Anyways, here’s one of the postcards that arrived that day:

 Russian dolls in traditional costumes RU – 483272

A wonderful collection of delicate-looking Russian dolls in colourful traditional folk costumes reflecting the various regions in Russia. They are not your ordinary Barbie dolls. They are made of porcelain and are delicately hand-painted. The clothes are superb, the headdresses beautiful. St. Petersburg has centuries-old tradition of doll-making that exists up to these days.

I so heart this! Printed at the back of the postcard: From Russia with Love.

Thank you very much, Mina.
Мила, из Камбоджи, я благодарю Вас очень много, с большой любовью.

Sunday Stamps 017: Folk arts from all over the world

 

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This week was very hectic that my post for this week was somewhat in limbo. I was leisurely surfing the net,  toggling one window with news about the developments of the volcano eruption in Iceland to another window with eyelastin reviews for awhile, when I suddenly realised that my Sunday Stamps draft needs publishing. I was about to hit the publish button earlier today when the power went out, thus, the delay…

I have several stamps that fall under the specified categories for this week’s theme begging to be featured. As much as I’d like to, I’m not going to get carried away this time so I’m limiting my choices to only a few.

I’d like to begin with … FOOD!

The above stamp is a part of the seven-set and souvenir sheet issued by the Portuguese Postal Office in a series called “Sabores da Lusofonia”, meaning, flavors of Lusophony. Lusophony is a collective word referring to Portuguese-speaking countries, so the series features some of the most interesting influences of Portuguese gastronomy  on countries who share the Portuguese language. The above dish is from Africa’s Cape Verde called Do-cozido à cachupa (a stew, basically, of pork, chicken, carrots, potatoes, garbanzos, and many others). I have also another stamp from the same series featuring no caloeira tempura which I featured in the previous Sunday Stamps.

Next… traditional costumes. So many to choose from but here’s what I randomly picked out from the lot:

A part of the 5-set definitive stamps issued in 1994, showing the traditional costumes of Cyprus. This one is affixed in a postcard that was sent to my husband’s Grandma, from a cousin who went to Cyprus for a holiday some twenty years ago. This postcard is now in my possession, having inherited my husband’s grandma’s postcard collection three years ago.

 

And last,  but definitely not the least… the textiles of Croatia.

 

In 2008, the Croatian Post launched a five-set postage stamps each representing regional motifs of folk costumes. Sunja, magical flowers that survived from the Baroque altar cloth on the aprons from Posavina and still exude scents; Bistra, corals that have come from the Pannonian Sea and in clinking, dark red rows enrich the blouses from Prigorje; Bizovac, the dialectics of the Slavonian full-empty gold-embroidery; and the thick weave of dark earthen colour – the “interior combustion” of Ravni Kotari. I love these folk arts/handicrafts from Croatia and really commend those who still do this up to now, thus preserving traditional arts and culture.

What we refer to as folk art is the outcome of longer, slowed-down time. History has always been created by individuals, and this also applies to art. However, art has only slowly been deposited in the awareness, resting rolled up for a lot longer than the passage of events, in mutually unconnected mounts and vales, across seven rivers and seventy seven mountains. What used to be enduring and persevering – dialects, fashion, surnames, customs, meals, tools, jobs and days… – all of these were local, unique, different and individual; all of these have nowadays become assimilated into a universal mass in the communication cauldron. —  Croatian Post Inc.